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Search Results 62 to 161 of about 7,701 (some duplicates have been removed)
CBS
May 20, 2012 5:00am PDT
and the northwestern united states. >>> you've been here for four years and you're about to enter tour of duty. and what is the israel center. greatcoat the department of the center cisco federation. established about 15 or 16 years ago to be a bridge between israel and the bay area's jewish committee. >>> both of you've been in the jewish committee in the bay area for a good amount of time. i'm wondering what are some of your observations about how the bay area understands the state to visit israel and that is really a culture >>> i found i divided into a couple of things but first the jewish committee here in the bay area is a large and fibrinogen very deeply connected to israel. and we feel great kinship israel is the unusual nation state of the world people. the jewish committee instinctively understands that since the connection between us is very strong and here in the bay area have felt very good in the last four years the political support for israel among elected officials as a very strong it's great understanding and french than the economic connection to in silicon valley and the
MSNBC
May 1, 2012 3:00pm EDT
the united states and afghanistan over the next decade. and will include sort of the outline for the withdrawal plan. we expect the president to address the nation and u.s. troops at 7:31 our time. that's a speech that will last for about 10 to 15 minutes, martin. and we will, of course, be carrying that live. president obama has arrived in afghanistan. he is meeting with afghanistan president hamid karzai. of course, this all comes on the one-year anniversary of the killing of osama bin laden. certainly this timing is not coincidental but president obama there to discuss the strategic partnership with the president of afghanistan, including the plan for withdrawal. >> and do you know anything or any detail yet about how this was carried out? because we knew absolutely nothing about it. the president clearly leaving the white house. i mean, i'm assuming that somebody must have known. what do we know about the detail of that? >> well, we know that of course, senior administration officials were aware of this plan. but the white house certainly keeping this a secret throughout
FOX News
May 24, 2012 12:00pm PDT
talks hit major snags. surprise, surprise, the negotiators rejected plans by the united states and five other world powers to curb the rogue nation's nuclear program. iran also insisted it had a right to enrich uranium accusing other nations of creating a "difficult atmosphere for talks." yesterday, officials pointed to signs that iran would be open to an agreement restarting nuclear inspections, but as the talks draw to a close, there is no sign of a deal. u.s. and other world leaders accusative ran of using the program as a cover for building a nuclear bomb. iran claims the program is for peaceful purposes only. and steve is live if us today in baghdad. steve? >>reporter: well, we are getting more details of some of the main goals for the negotiators for the sex -- six powers, with a main goal for iran to stop producing highly enriched uranium. this is the kind of material that can be developed very quickly into fuel for use in a nuclear weapon. >> iran's declared readiness to address the issue of 20 percent enrichment and came with its own five-point plan including their assertion th
FOX News
May 5, 2012 11:00am PDT
arrest and got to the united states embassy, and he asked for release and guarantee of safe treatment but chen guangcheng said china threatened his family if he did not leave the embassy and the united states urged him to make a decision quickly and no he fears for his family's safety and want as asylum in america. he may get his wish with a visa to study not united states, what does this tell us about modern china and about obama's china policy? dramatic escape. he climbed over walls to escape house arrest, injured himself, is driven by heroic colleagues in the human rights community, 300 miles to beijing and stays in safe houses before they say he has to go to the embassy for safety. what does this episode toll us about china? >> during the cold war getting into the embassy gate would have been the happy ending but, now, it does not work out that way. what it tells us about china is contrary to the school of thought here is a country that is increasingly confident that it will be the second great power of the 21st century they are terrified of blind legal activistses living under ho
CNN
May 21, 2012 1:00pm PDT
for his only interview with me while in the united states. we talk about his personal relationship with president obama and even his personal relationship with mitt romney. stand by for that as well. >>> and the man sometimes nicknamed america's supermayor, has made a super gaffe. >>> i'm wolf blitzer in chicago. you're in the situation room. >>> but first, through my exclusive far reaching interview, i just completed only a few minutes ago with the afghan president hamid karzai, it's his only interview while here in the united states. we sat down only moments ago, and he spoke of president obama just minutes before the interview. the three leaders are here for a meeting in chicago. listen to this. >> no, we didn't have a three-way meeting, we had a three-way photograph taking. >> just a photo opportunity? >> why not a meeting? why not have a three-way meeting and discuss the most important issues facing afghanistan, pakistan and the united states. >> it wasn't for us to decide on the three-way meeting. the united states was the host and perhaps they saw it fit for some other time.
SFGTV2
May 10, 2012 2:00am PDT
if you look at the successful record of immigrants to the united states, whether skilled or unskilled, documented or undocumented, across the last 200 years and particularly in the last 25 years and with the great renaissance of data that we now have at our disposal to analyze more clearly the impact of all types of immigration from 1990 forward, we realize that immigrants, again, skilled and unskilled, lawful and undocumented, bring to the effort of community building and business building and economy building something that is moderately intangible for now. if we work at it for a few more years it will be tangible and we will be able to quantify part of it. it's something that represents itself in generational achievement both for those immigrants who arrive, who form small businesses at a rate which is disproportionately higher than native-born citizens, for their children that in turn achieve at a level that is higher on average than the children of native-born citizens, not to disparage those who come from the united states or come from long lines of families that come from the u
WHUT
May 6, 2012 6:00pm EDT
different than the united states. >> i think it made segregation almost look like a civil affairs -- whereas in south africa it was an art, science, and something white students could study at universities. >> before we go to the break, you mentioned nelson mandela. you mentioned that the african national congress. how did you all come together, the two of you? >> i went to high school at the school bus was known much more for its left-leaning and trotsky ideology. so, my conversion to the african national congress came a lot more because i enjoyed the inclusive become of the focus on activism. i enjoyed the way in which it joyfully understood how it could take the struggle against apartheid, that while there was life and death of risks involved, we were still able to celebrate our humanity and not to give it up at all. so, in 1980, my great conversion to what we call congress politics, the politics of the african national congress, happened, but i remain ever thankful for the theoretical rigor i learned from the kind of trotsky movement which i emerged from. >> june 12 as a celebration as w
CSPAN
May 24, 2012 6:00pm EDT
of the council, this body on which the united states has a seat and has what you described as veto power, is a recommending body and it appears also to me as i look back at 160, section 160, subsection 2g that it is up to the assembly and not to the council to decide upon the equitable sharing of financial and other economic benefits from activities in the area. so, secretary clinton, i was wondering if you could help me understand is my reading correct or am i missing something? >> senator, the assembly cannot take up an issue unless recommended by the council. any decision that would impose any obligations on the united states or otherwise deal with substance must go through the council. the secretariat has no decision making authority. the practical consequence of this is that the united states would have the right to reject or veto any decision that would result in a substantive obligation on the united states or that would have financial and budgetary implications, and that is due to the fact that the u.s. is unique in having a permanent seat on the sea bed authority council which i
Current
May 24, 2012 5:41am PDT
women by double digits and be president of the united states. >> bill: what are the republicans thinking when, for example, like on the violence against women act or the lily led led better act and the federal leave act and all of these issues which do impact just the rights of women to be considered first class citizens i guess in this country. laura, what are they thinking? >> i don't know what they're thinking. a lot of their moves have not been very politically smart lately. but you see them like, for instance, with the violence against women act, republicans put forth a woman to introduce the act sandy adams from florida. she was actually a domestic violence victim. she didn't actually write the bill but they basically boehner chose her and said because you're a woman and you were abused, you're going to sponsor this and it is going to make us look less anti-woman here. we've got all of these republican women that are supporting it so how can it be a war on women. it is a war on democratic ideals. so i t
CSPAN
May 18, 2012 11:00am EDT
in this field. september 11th hijackers used united states and foreign financial institutions to hold, move, and retrieve their money. they deposited money into united states accounts via wire transfers and depp sits of traveler's checks and cash that was brought from overseas. they kept funds in foreign accounts which they accessed through atmst and credit card transactions in the home land. according to the september 11th commission, the plot cost al qaeda somewhere in the range of $400,000 to $500,000, of which approximately $300,000 passed through the hijackers' bank casualties here in the united states. after the attacks, the united states publicly declared that the fight against al qaeda financing was as critical as the fight against al qaeda itself. the charge of the united states intelligence and law enforcement communities was clear -- if we choke off the terrorists' money, we limit their ability to conduct mass casualty attacks. within months of the attacks, the department of defense, the fbi, the cia, and perhaps most importantly the department of treasury launched a swift and un
MSNBC
May 1, 2012 12:00pm PDT
that people take a look at peel's previous statements. the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden. >> we have breaking news at this very moment. we understand the president is in afghanistan. this on the first anniversary of the killing of osama bin laden. we understand that he traveled there overnight. there was something of a "meet the press" and media blackout but we are able to confirm the president is indeed in afghanistan. i'm joined now by kristen welker who is at the white house. please tell us what do you know? what have you heard? >> hi there. good afternoon to you. we can tell you that president obama arrived in afghanistan in kabul at 2:39 p.m. our time, which is 11:09 in afghanistan. right now, he is at the afghan presidential palace with president hamid karzai. we're just getting this information so i'll read it to you. he is there to sign the strategic partnership agreement which is essentially going to outline the relationship between the united states and afghanistan over the next decade. and will include sort of the outline for the wit
CSPAN
May 17, 2012 5:30am EDT
in russia. whether united states gives us pn it tr or not, it is not something that we want to continue for several republics. first, we want americans to be our good partners. secondly, politically, it is one of the vestiges of the cold war mentality still with us and spoils political environment for the reasons which one cannot even explain today because the reasons why jackson/vanek appeared in the first place, how it was wrong even at that time, are no longer. so what is left as a vestige of the cold war still with us and reflections of a wider problem in our relations, and the cold war mentality that sometimes still persists as one of my american colleagues said to me we have victims of the post cold war hangover, which is right. very frequently we judge each other through this that had been developed and not through the commonality of purpose that we have today. it is extremely important. we want to work with the americans. we want to do business with the americans. we want you to be present in the russian market. we stand to benefit from partnership with american companies like o
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 1:00pm EDT
century a pluralist philosophy and explanation of what the united states was like. now, basically just there is a lot of different ways to define and understand pluralism and so just for our purposes of fairly straight forward and basic definition of it is a vision of in this case the united states as a country with many different cultures, many different ethnic groups and there isn't one single american identity that everyone has to subscribe to in every way. another way to think about it is the way in which immigrants could identify themselves. they could identify themselves in hyphenated terms as irish american, polish american and italian american and what i want to do today is get at the roots of that identity, the roots of the development of that conception of what the united states is. we're to do it by going through three different sections, three different sets of developments. the first is going to be the world of party politics like the image we just looked at from the period from about 1840 to the end of the 19th century. it is a period when there is very stiff competition
CSPAN
May 24, 2012 4:30pm EDT
delineated the outer edge of the continental shelf of the united states. other countries can prohibit the united states from coming in to an ecs. we can't, because we're not party to the treaty. the only way to protect that outside of this is to have -- t accede to the treaty. and finally, no company is going to put millions of dollars into the effort to go out and do the mining or do the drilling if they don't have the legal certainty protection of the treaty. so, there are further reasons in answer to mr. fuller. we'll have mr. fuller in here and others who oppose it have a chance to explore this. senator menendez. >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you for beginning this series of hearings, which i think is incredibly important. couple of years ago, i chaired the beginning of one of these on your behalf. i think it is even more important today than it was then. i appreciate all of our distinguished witnesses and their service to our country. general dempsey, when you took an oath as the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, and when you took an oath to the service that you original
CSPAN
May 16, 2012 7:30am EDT
front of the u.s. capitol, this is half an hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of united states. >> detail, colors. present arms. [silence] >> detail, color guard, right shoulder, order. arm. >> please stand for the assessment of the colors like united states capitol police, and remain standing for our national anthem. [silence] >> detail, color guar guard. present arms. >> we will now have the national anthem by kathy williams. ♪ oh, say, can you see ♪ by the dawn's early light ♪ what so proudly we hailed ♪ at the twilight's last gleaming? ♪ ♪ whose broad stripes and bright stars ♪ ♪ thro' the perilous fight ♪ o'er the ramparts we watched ♪ were so gallantly streaming t ♪ and the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ ♪ oh, say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave ♪ ♪ o'er the land of the free ♪ and the home of the brave? >> detail, color guard. order, right shoulder, arms. >> please remain standing for the invocation. >> please join me in prayer. our gracious fathe
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 12:00am EDT
have china china assets from the border with north korea. the last thing the united states or china wants is some sort of confrontation that would somehow cause them to butt heads as they did in 1953, so i think any time there is a serious thought given to some sort of military action this is constantly at the top, not even the top even halfway up the escalation ladder this is constantly the concern that i think every u.s. president has had to think about seriously, so that is certainly one of the reasons, the china factor, and the other is that we, the united states went into iraq or afghanistan because it became the top foreign policy issue on which the head ministrations of a resolution. now, we can debate whether there was the right or wrong finger. many americans think it was the wrong thing. many americans think nothing was resolved and, you know, that's a completely different question. i think the plant for korea is i don't really think that the north korea issue has risen to that level of priority. it's been a crisis the you want to solve at least in the sense of preventing
CSPAN
May 5, 2012 3:59pm EDT
president of the united states. [applause] >> jim gray has been nominated. >> and scotty bowman from michigan and i nominate lee wrights or vice-president of the united states libertarian nomination. [applause] >> i nominate jim burns for vice-president of the united states. >> jim burns has been nominated. further nominations from the floor? seeing none, i will close -- sorry, i see one more. >> i am mary o'connor from minnesota. i nominate sam sloan for vice- president. >> i am sorry, i have been informed by his secretary that he is not eligible. further nominations? >> i nominate jim gray for vice- president. >> he was already nominated. if you like to nominate someone please come to the microphone. >> i have been informed that nominations are supposed to be in writing, so those who have done the nominating, there are three names that the secretary is already in possession of. the go-ahead and state your nomination, but submitted to the secretary. >> i am from the great state of florida. and nominate -- i nominate nota, none of the above. >> another seconding for jim byrnes. >> se
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 2:40pm EDT
the gaithersburg book festival we hear from david stew wetter on the third vice president of the united states. his called everyone emperor. he he's introduced by john ashman the founder of the gaithersburg book festival. >> surveys are available at the tend. we hope you enjoy the rest of of your day at the festival. [inaudible conversations] good afternoon, everyone. welcome to the third annual gaithersburg book festival. i'm judd ashman a member of the city council. oop. i hope everyone is all right over there. [inaudible conversations] it is a i have i vibrant diversity that celebrates the support of the cultural arts. we're pleased to bring the event free of charge thanks to the generous support of our sponsors. for our consideration and everyone here, i should say, please silence any devices that make any kind of noise at all. in order keep improving the event. we want your feedback. please grab a survey from the table over here. from the info booth it'll be up on the website as of later today. please help us keep improving the event. if there's time for qa please come to the microphone with t
CSPAN
May 8, 2012 5:00am EDT
interest in the united states and he said his message in washington was the united states is one budget deal away from being restored on the world stage. and i think -- and he was also saying that some countries in east asia were saying, look, don't spend your time with the united states. we're going to be the next power you know, so pay attention to us. and it's a challenge for the united states on how to deal with that. so frankly, you know, my feeling is that whether it's a question of the united states' ability to be a strong economy, to be innovative, to support foreign affairs budget, whether it's security issues, it has to start at home and i think that's a key issue of trying to restore the fundamentals of u.s. growth which include dealing with the spending and debt and deficit policies. not relying solely on monetary policy as we've largely been doing because if you rely on monetary policy for a long time, you plant the seeds of other problems. i don't only mean the fiscal issues. it's also what i find interesting now and what i experience with the world bank is that because i
CSPAN
May 6, 2012 5:30pm EDT
and the missouri both had several hundred years of contact with french traders by the time the united states came along. so there were people in the tribe that could read french extremely fluently. speak it, read it, whatever. so the letters that he sent out, he sent them in that language because it was pretty much a universal language at the time. the otos and the missouris were kind of a small tribe in that they had a lot of he enemies and so they were always looking for allies and resources. so when they came along, lewis and clark saw this as them notifying that the united states now owns this territory and you're under our control or whatever. the otos saw that as a very important and potentially powerful ally against their enemies. so this was important to them. and that's probably why they kept it. lewis and clark, they met with several oto leaders at that time. one was big ax and one was big horse. now, this is the certificate of friendship that was given to big ax. and you can see his name right here. >> what does this say? >> it basically just says that the man named big ax is a friend
CSPAN
May 5, 2012 10:00am EDT
might appear to suggest trading large areas of europe for war with the united states may be hard going. at the ambassadorial group in washington, secretary general sticker confirmed this was not a needle-steering group and the council had not given it any power. a number of nations expressed strong dissatisfaction about the lack of information they were receiving about berlin planning, about the ambassadorial group giving instructions and about the way that the allied powers were presenting papers to nato committees on a take it or leave it basis. the canadian ambassador said if the allies are to be committed in war, they should be informed in peace. the belgian ambassador added, since they're all in danger of war, they should all take part in the planning. the four powers responded quickly to this strong sense of dissatisfaction in the nato council. on september 27th, they provided a full report on live oak plans and secretary general also presented the ambassadors with these new suggested instructions to nato military authorities, which he helped to draft. the instructions stated, if
CSPAN
May 29, 2012 6:00am EDT
. may god bless our men and women in uniform, and may god bless the united states of america. [applause] >> think you very much, mr. president. -- think you very much. there is a tradition of the wall with a new name is red, it is honored. 10 new names were added to the wall. we ask families of these heroes to rise as their loved ones are red. -- are read. albert corava. [applause] joseph william albit. richard carld hunt. [applause] richard dwayne stalker. [applause] david mcqueen disowitz. walter allan grensy. frank a. miery. david lawrence deckerd. [applause] larry morgan kelly. [applause] johnny owen brooks. [applause] now there is the names of 58,282 heroes. ladies and gentlemen, please live at -- please rise as the president, first lady and other distinguished leaders take their place at the wall with the a place at a solid who represent not only loved ones, but all who served, suffered, it sacrifice in the name of freedom. joining the president and first lady is mrs. rose marie saber brown, wife of the medal of honor winner. joining the vice-president of the united states, joe bi
SFGTV2
May 18, 2012 11:00am PDT
, in 1961, the cuban constitution was identical to that of the united states. those words in that constitution did not protect us. words do not protect you. understanding and be leaving in the words do. -- and believing in the words do. we today have a serious problem in that regard. the "new york times" three weeks ago -- "time" magazine three weeks ago reported as a cover story how the constitution is under siege, and "newsweek" about two months ago had a cover story about the failure of americans to understand our government. some very scary statistics. two out of every three graduating high-school students today believe that the three branches of government are republican, democrat, and independent. that is an actual poll. 75% of all americans don't know that religious freedom is protected by the first amendment. 75%. more americans can name the judges on "american idol" than on the supreme court of the united states. what does this mean to us? how did we get here? well, first of all, unless the next generation understands the obligations imposed by the constitution, w
WETA
May 13, 2012 10:00am EDT
in his speech in prague. the very first summit was held in the united states in 2010. two years later we gathered even more leaders together to focus on the seriousness of the risk of nuclear terrorism, the vulnerability of nuclear material around the world, the international cooperation it will take to secure that material, and prevent it ever coming into the hands of terrorists. >> so it is material as well as existing weaponry? >> and that is right. covers both sets of concerns. >> then you take it one level further. and know-how is involved. >> that is exactly right. >> in the united states, often we are more concerned nowadays -- is the correct phrase a suitcase bomb or something like that? >> improvised nuclear device. >> tell me the phrase again? >> improvised nuclear device. >> what does that mean, in my language? >> it's a pretty crude weapon, but it has probably a lot more material than our own warheads that we have built to go on the front end of missiles and travel reliably 3,000 miles. an improvised nuclear device would be bigger than a suitcase. the smaller you are, the mor
CSPAN
May 14, 2012 8:30am EDT
of real significance to the united states. to do that, we will dedicate 80% of our effort to four major cases. right now they are syria, kenya, north/central america and burma. then we'll have another eight to ten places where we can test new approaches or make a welcome difference by just sending the the right person at the right time. so far i think we're gaining traction in each of our major priority engagements. many of you are working in these places, and we realize that we won't know it all or know best about them, so we hope for your support. in syria we are providing a nontraditional surge to empower and unite a fractured, nonviolent opposition. as the secretary announced, that includes providing nonlethal assistance. we are also working with partners to set up an outpost for the internal opposition to coordinate and communicate with the international community. in kenya we are helping to develop plans to insure peaceful and credible elections a year before the vote. incidentally, kenya is one place where we've seen a potential model for broad cooperation and innovation. in nort
CSPAN
May 1, 2012 10:30pm EDT
in the history of trade and taxation in the united states and is the author of several scholarly works, 19th and 20th tariff policy. long a civil war buff, his attention turned to the presidency of abraham lincoln after a fortuitous discovery at library of congress. the find marked the beginning of a four year hunt for documents culminating in his book, co-authored with sebastian page, lincoln and the movement for black resettlement. in addition to writing, dr. magnus is an academic programs director at the institute for humane studies at george mason university, also taught in public administration at american university, and international tragtional trade . also in his biography, something i find fascinating. he is an avid scuba diver. and plays underwater hockey. for the washington, d.c., and i love this name -- beltway bottom feeders. there is probably no end of applicants for that team. after dr. magnus makes his presentation, rodney ross will come to read a poem of -- of john willis menard that is very appropriate. actually there are copies, print copies of it on the table outside. rod
FOX
May 27, 2012 4:00am EDT
. >>> today on united states farm report. wheat harvest gets an early start which has implications for soy production. >>> new canola varieties make this a choice for more farmers. >>> and a corn crop is look great on paper and if you had rain. >>> united states farm report brought to you by the 2012 chevy silv era do. welcome to u-s farm report, i'm . >>> el hello and welcome to united states farm report. it has been interesting to watch the adjustment across the industry to expanded trading hours. friend was the media have quietly ditched the term before the bell. many check phones at new times, elevators struggling to figure out what bids are done. consider if the u.s.d.a. decides to delay reports until that brief window when the markets close in the afternoon. it would man a block buster report would begin trading at the same time as happy hour. what's wrong with that? time fort headlines. here is tine. >> thank you. hello. for the first time in season u.s.d.a. is new release its harvesting update for the winter wheat crop. some states have made substantial gains. 3% is now harvested
MSNBC
May 3, 2012 9:00am PDT
a very solid marker that this case, the chen case, was important to the united states. understand a couple of things. this is a broad important relationship between the united states and china, it's always going to be difficult and complex on a good day. then you throw something like this into the mix and it can have the potential for tensions although, up until today, it appeared the united states and china had worked constructively, intensely, to try to resolve this. go ahead. >> p.j., it sounds like someone is doubling back on the original agreement and/or the terms were not fully understood. chen guangcheng saying he felt he wife was going to be beaten to death if he didn't leave the u.s. embassy. it sounds like he at one point said that the u.s. had not -- was not pro active enough. that certainly doesn't look good. >> well, understand that mr. chen was trying to do something that was unique without precedent. normally the united states tries to work to bring activists out of china where they feel they are threatened. mr. chen specifically had the united states negotiate with
CSPAN
May 14, 2012 8:00pm EDT
. as the president said, preventing a nuclear iran is in the interest of the united states. we have issued reports, and the most recent one was issued on and.ary 1 and it includes a distinguished panel of four democratic members of congress, admirals' and generals and also experts to area our last report supported the view that the best approached to this challenge is a simultaneous pursuit of a triple track policy, which is of diplomacy, tough sanctions, and a credible and invisible military threat. we also issued a white paper on each of those tracks. i want to highlight one recommendation on each of those tracks, and then i will change it over to mort zuckerman. and the military threat we believe the united states should boost the credibility of its military to air around us nuclear facilities, and we have spelled out how to do so. one element has been selling bunker busters' to israel. we do not advocate an israeli strike, but this will send a strong signal to tehran to negotiate in good faith, encourage other states that the alternative to supporting u.s. sanctions could be military conflict
CSPAN
May 26, 2012 10:00pm EDT
a bigger problem within diplomacy. but the united states has been willing to use both force and diplomacy to really try to solve the problem. i think in the case of north korea, that that -- it's just not registered like that. that is not specific to any administration. we have had crises with north korea and every administration has made the same calculation. when we reach a crisis with north korea, are we willing to go all-out to the end to solve this thing, or do we want a solution that will park it momentarily, put him diplomatic tracks, present and kevin and want move on to the other issues that most concern us, whether it is the domestic and economic situation or iraq or afghanistan or syria or the middle east peace process. these tend to be the more it important issues in u.s. foreign policy. >> the other issue that makes iraq different is the u.s. korea alliance. have you see the dynamics of the alliance playing into our ability to adjust the top concerns that the u.s. has related to north korea's nuclear program? >> undeniably, and when we look at the situation, south korea is mo
CSPAN
May 26, 2012 12:00pm EDT
in history the united states needs latin america more than latin america needs the united states? now, cast your mind back a decade ago or little over a decade ago. that question would have seemed absurd. the united states was the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world, the most powerful country economically, politically, militarily. why on earth would it need anyone, let alone a continent known for its economic crises, its political instability, for having almost no global clout? well, how times have changed. and how used we we have become o the fact of change. there's an old jewish joke that i heard probably about 5,000 times when i was growing up, and it's set in eastern europe in the 19th century in a period when borders were changing very rapidly. and the story goes that a woman is pegging up washing, and a kazakh soldier rides up and declares, old woman, from this day forth, this land is no longer poland, it is imperial russia. and then he rides off. and she watches him go, and she says, thank god, i couldn't stand another polish winter. [laughter] thank you for laughing. i'll p
PBS
May 7, 2012 12:00pm PDT
. and in relation to the united states government, whether it is the clinton administration or bush administration or obama administration, they're probably better understood stood more like francement they're sometime as lined with the united states, sometimes o posed. postly they are just trying to stay out of the way and do their own thing. >> ann bremmer and steve coll when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: . >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders:. >> and by bloomberg:. >> from studios in new york city captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: ian bremmer is here president of eurasia group, his new book every nation for itself, winners and losers in a g-zero world t paints a picture in a world in which no single power is able to take be the responsibility of global leadership. larry summers says everyone who cares about our collective future will need to carefully consider this book's impressive arguments. i'm pleased to have ian bremmer back at this table, welcome. >> hi, cha
CSPAN
May 26, 2012 7:00am EDT
geopolitics -- host: oil and gas production in the western hemisphere is booming, with the united states emerging less dependent on supplies from an unstable middle east. vens, nigeria, and mexico. host: southeast michigan. what are gas prices like there, dave? caller: very good. someone saying on your show that prices were falling for the holidays. that's not true here in southeast michigan, which people here like to drive a lot up north. we have a wonderful, beautiful up north. but the prices here average in the low $3.90's. they were a week ago in the mid $3.60, around there. for my employees, it's all the same for them. we're traveling 60 mile an hour round trips and that really hits the pocketbook when you're having to travel every day for week. i'll companies are certainly quick to bring the price down. thanks and have a good holiday. host: it's not our oil that we're talking about, it belongs to oil companies. new hampshire, john on our democrats line joins us. hi. caller: just one note i've acknowledged over the last few weeks. we have a caller on your show, but he was discussing
CSPAN
May 18, 2012 5:00pm EDT
disruptive not only in a conflict can be destructive to the united states but other countries as well and that is one of the things about military operations in cyberspace with cascading effect that are hard to predict. we have concerns about this and this is why we created joint military platforms like a strategic security dialogue to talk about issues that we feel our potential for friction in the u.s./china relationship. cyber is one of those areas. we don't talk about space, nuclear and missile defense areas as part of the strategic dialogue. >> you mentioned last year spending was almost double what the public acknowledgment was. what things will you give us as examples that they are spending on this year? you did not speculate on the number but what they are spending on this year but not publicly acknowledged? >> we think their nuclear force modernization occurs and research and development money that goes through their defense industry we also think is from a different budget, a different account. some foreign acquisitions come from a different account as well and some local co
CSPAN
May 24, 2012 5:30pm EDT
the united states, have observed for centuries. given that we haven't, to date, had any major disruptions at sea, can you respond to that and talk about why it's -- why the sense now is that it's imperative to ratify the treaty? >> i can. the customary international law evolves and i can give you an example of something on the land domain in a moment. but it evolves. and it is subject to individual interpretations. so, threading this back to my earlier answer. the rise of new nations competing for resources, brazil, russia, india, china, the list goes on and on. their rise puts us in a position where unless we have this convention with which to form a basis to have the conversation about resources of the sort you're talking about, does cause us to be increasingly at risk to instability. and that's my job, instability. the secretary can speak eloquently about the economic h i issues, but i'm speaking to the security issues. so that is what has changed. and i'll give you the example of the land domain that i mentioned. we are party to the geneva convention. there were plenty of customary i
CSPAN
May 23, 2012 12:00pm EDT
billion that would be royalties that would be paid to the isa as "pos opposed to the united states and of course go to the organization in kingston, jamaica for redistribution to the developing world. and this is the first time in history that an international organization, the u.n. in this case, would possess taxing authority over this country. now, i've heard the veto argument. discussed by one of the other members here. i think the secretary ritsch. it's really not too important to discuss that, because there are two entities that would make that determination. you have the council, the 36th-member council, the assembly, to make these decisions, but the point is, under article 160, it's going to cost us. well, let's see. yeah. under article 82, payments and contributions shall be made annually rp to all production at a site after this period's time. what we're saying, it's going to be paid regardless of where you think it should go or where you think it is going to go. the second thing i want to kov herb is the environmental and, we in this, for the ten years now have rejected i
Current
May 3, 2012 5:00pm PDT
is the united states didn't have much competition in those days we won the war and japan and europe were not major competitors. but even today germany, other countries like germany, they have a social compact very similar to the one we had. and that means german workers are enjoying the benefits of productivity increases, unemployment is relatively low, and their standard of living is very high, and the very rich take home a much smaller share of the total gains from growth than they do in the united states. >> professor i want to focus on that last issue, because you are exactly correct. you know i agree with you, any importance of unions and the social account that we all believe will help the entirety of our population central to what we should be doing. let's talk about trade in particular, because we have entered a series of multi-lateral and by bilateral trade agreements how can workers compete against labor in the number you hear is 2 to 3 billion additional workers competes against our domestic work force. so that general motors and ford are now invest
CSPAN
May 13, 2012 5:30pm EDT
important basic research projects in american history underway in the united states. tim was the founding director of that project. after his service on that project and continuing to publish other acclaimed books, he now actually holds his job as the collector of the richard nixon library out in california. as the director of the nixon library, tim has not only been organizing world history projects of his own, he's actually set precedents in almost setting the model of how to run a presidential library under the most difficult possible circumstances. it's a tribute to his abilities. then to tim's right, your left is bob strong. i know bob strong principally through his scholarship. bob works in that strange netherworld where you study american politics by understanding its political history. some days he looks like a political historian and could be an exemplar of both. i think he's probably the single most prominent and important historian of the carter presidency to publish so far. his work on carter's foreign policy is today the standard work that any scholar looking at that must rea
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 9:00pm EDT
. china sits right on the border with north korea. the last thing the united states or china wants is some sort of confrontation or a configuration of the peninsula that would cause the two to butt heads as they did in 1953, and so i think any time there is serious thought given to some sort of military action, this is constantly at the top -- not even the top, but half way up the ladder, this is a concern that every u.s. president, i think, has had to think about seriously. i think that's certainly one of the reasons, the china factor, and the other is that we, united states went into iraq or afghanistan because it became thee top foreign policy issue on which the administration saw a revolution, a final resolution. now, we can debate whether that was the right or wrong thing. many americans think it was the wrong thing. many americans think that nothing was resolved there, and, you know, that's a completely different question. i mean i think the point for korea is that i don't really think that the north korea issue has risen to that level of priority for an administration. it's been a c
CSPAN
May 4, 2012 1:30pm EDT
-2012 there will be no war, no deal. this is a to 13 problem. and ultimately it will be a problem with the united states fundamentally is going to have to wrestle with. syria, the situation there will continue until two things occur. number one, the russians can be dissuaded from their policy of backing -- and there would be some fundamental change on the ground. right now you don't even have a hurting stalemate. you have a situation where the regime still controls the issuance of state power. the opposition will not break but neither can it cause the regime to break. now what to do about this. this of course is the great co-none drum. what do we do? here again i am a believer. in the united states determines that it is in its vital national interest to remove this regime, then it should act comprehensively and decisively in an effort to do it. if it does not believe it it is in the vital national interest to resume it and in my judgment it is not a vital national interest, we should stay out and certainly not adopt the kind of half-baked ill advised, half measures that will get us into a military commi
CSPAN
May 1, 2012 12:30pm EDT
in the united states peaked. between 2008 and 2009 it actually fell from 12 million to 11 million people. since 2009, it's held steady at 11 -- probably trending downward. on a net basis, illegal mig sgrags now zero or negative. the border is in fact under control. the number of apprehensions -- 22,000 officers and they're having a harder time finding anybody to arrest. apprehensions at the mexico-u.s. border are now lower than at any time since 1972. have more and more officers chasing fewer and fewer people. part of this is the collapse in labor demand. particularly in residential home construction. after the great recession of 2008. but it's also been because the united states is quietly, without anybody really noticing, dramatically expanded temporary legal migration. given the choice, of course, migrants would much rather come here with legal documents. and in 2010, there were 517,000 -- 537,000 entries of mexicans into the united states with temporary work visas. the largest number of in history. so one of the reasons that illegal mig sgrags down is because opportunity have opened up in t
CSPAN
May 2, 2012 3:00pm EDT
the united states and when i do, almost everywhere i go people, i'll ask them to raise hands. i do these informal polls. how many of you think that immigration is involved in national security and the hands go up. and rational people can argue how we're going to ration stuff. how many want flexible working conditions bi-nationally. hands go up. expand human rights, some hands go up. ours in a nation built on liberties, not on human rights but some of the things are similar. how many want a reduction in the noise along the border, all the hands go up. i will make one clarification and point here. i think, it's my experience that the border communities do suffer very significant financial cost and criminal justice law enforcement health care, education, et cetera. the nation as a whole benefits phenomenally from migration, but the cost and joys of migration are not evenly distributed. how many of you want to see a reduction in the political violence and the cartel stuff activities in mexico, all the hands go up, but we don't know quite how to deal with that and we are not willing to
CSPAN
May 15, 2012 10:00am EDT
. this is a bill for the entire united states of america. it's a bill for the taxpayers, for heavens sake. so senator tester, thank you for your leadership and that of senator vitter and i appreciate senator moran coming on to -- i don't have questions because the questions i would have asked had been asked while i was listening, but thank you very much. let's keep this you and let's redouble our resolve to actually get an accomplishment for the taxpayers and for the american public. >> well, thank you, senator -- >> live now on capitol hill this morning where the senate health committee and senate subcommittee on primary health and ageing is holding a hearing on the cost of hiv/aids drugs. senator bernie sanders has introduced a bill to shorten the time before generics can be made of those drugs. it includes an annual $3 billion prize for hiv/aids drug research. testifying this morning nobel laureate economist joseph stiglitz, harvard law professor lawrence less ig and a number of public health figures. vermont senator bernie sanders is chairing this hearing. he's in the room. this is about
CSPAN
May 17, 2012 3:30pm EDT
in the region. this supreme leader built an -- towards the united states. so if you are assessing american interests and looking at the region, you have to look at what iran's behave hear been towards american interests over time. i can say this, actually, even though you're asking me to assume a different persona, back in the 1990s when i was a negotiator in the middle east, we were constantly contending with iranian-inspired efforts to subvert the peace process through acts of terror. so there's a history here of being hofstile towards american interests. we have seen different iranian leaderships 24r50e69 leaderships at least in the forms of their presidents, talking about a dialogue of civilizations and the possibilities of trying to find ways of building bridges between the two sides. he was clearly not able to deliver very much. if anything at all. so i think we have to look at iran through a lens of hostility and threats. i think we also have to look at iran through a lens that, their behave hear, from time to time, been adjusted tactical. not strategically but tactically when, in f
CNN
May 7, 2012 4:00pm EDT
in two decades, we're looking at what it means for the united states. i'm wolf blitzer, you're still in "the situation room." the vice president joe biden said over the weekend he's fine with gay marriage and arnie duncan says he believes gay and lesbians should be allowed to marry. putting him at odds with the president of the united states. jessica yellin is working the story for us. jessica, causing quite an uproar there, what's going on? >> reporter: this is clearly an unwelcome topic for a white house that pronounces to make all decisions based on principle not on politics. it certainly looks as if the vice president supports gay marriage. >> who do you love? the president sets the policy. i am absolutely comfortable that the fact that men marrying wo i and women marrying women, are entitled to all the civil rights and the civil liberties. >> reporter: but the president is vague. >> my feelings about this are constantly evolving. i struggle with this. >> reporter: this is a flash point election. to argue biden's comments weren't new. >> i think they were entirely consistent with
CSPAN
May 25, 2012 6:00am EDT
the veto word is not used, also not used in the constitution of the united states but no one doubts the president has it. we have the ability to do it to the language that is there. that will become a bit more clear as we come forward. >> thank you, chairman kerry. i'm very glad that we're having this in today and i appreciate all of you for being here. senator webb and i sent chairman kerry and ranking member luber a letter back in april urging we move forward to consideration of law of the sea treaty and i'm grateful to your broad and searching and supportive testimony here today. when i was brand-new to the senate, one of the earlier meetings i took was with the then outgoing chief of naval operations. when i asked him what is the single most important thing we can do to help the navy over the next decade, he said without hesitation, ratify the law of the sea treaty. i was taken aback by the. given other budget priorities, operational issues, as it turned out admiral estimation of the importance of this issue is shared i'm stomach every living chief of naval operations not to men
CNN
May 3, 2012 6:00am PDT
playing days. >>> we're in danger. the words of chen guangcheng now begging the united states to allow his family to board hillary clinton's plane to america. >>> would you pay $1,500 for a piece of stale cake? "cnn newsroom" starts right now. we do begin this hour with breaking news. with a rare and startling look inside the mind of osama bin laden. right now the public is getting its first look at documents seized in the raid that killed the al qaeda mastermind. they are in his own words. and they capture a fading leader desperate to launch another catastrophic strike on the united states. hundreds and hundreds of pages are now appearing on the website of combatting terrorism center at west point. peter bergen is our national security expert and was given early access to this so-called treasure-trove of material. what's been your biggest take away? >> i was able to review some of the documents that are being released today in the course of reporting a book i have written on the hunt for bin laden. the take aways clearly don't have operational information that would be useful to the cia a
SFGTV2
May 18, 2012 11:30am PDT
't know is that the median income of lawyers in the united states is $62,000. they need to understand that before they incur $100,000 in debt. is there always room for another good lawyer? we need good lawyers. there always is. you have to ask yourself how much that you can afford -- how much debt you can afford. they have been watching too much "boston legal." you see $100,000 starting salaries. that may be for the top 10 students at the top 10 law schools. there were 30,000 graduates this year. what are the others going to do? there are jobs available and good jobs available, but we have to first let them know what to expect upon graduation. second thing we have to do is make sure we continue to have the profession look like our society. two spots of the examples. hispanic lawyers, less than 4%. 15% of our society. african americans come 8% come away under-represented. what we are doing in that regard as we have minority scholarships and a program where we put minority students with federal judges and state judges. we have a diversity center, which are the only four missions of the
CSPAN
May 14, 2012 11:00pm EDT
that would bind the united states. and by doing so in a way that is never submitted for congressional specifically senate approval that just keeps congress out of the loop and unable to have its proper role in these issues. and why it's so important, mr. chairman, is because there are significant policy and operational concerns with the e.u. code of conduct or something that resembles it with regard to our security. for instance an unclassified excerpt from the executive summary of the joint staff operations assessment of the draft e.u. code said if the united states were to make a good faith effort at implementing the requirements of the draft code there could be operations impacts on u.s. military space operations in several areas, up quote. and i have no doubt, mr. chairman, that attempting to comply with something like the e.u. code of conduct would impact our space operations. we would be doing things or not doing things that would otherwise not happen. becoming a signatory on this type of code of conduct without congressional approval appears intended to implement international
CSPAN
May 9, 2012 4:30pm EDT
of the united states against incoming intercontinental ballistic nuclear missiles. and to me that puts them in a fairly important category for all the consideration we might have. there has also been some discussion about some of the recent test failures. it almost hearkens back to some of the earlier debates in the first place. there was a time when people said this is star wars. this is an utterly unworkable, unreachable system. that's like hitting a bullet with a bullet. so many times i remember that debate two decades ago, hitting a bullet with a bullet. how impossible. how ridiculous. yet, mr. chairman, as you know, today the closing speeds of our hit-to-kill technology is far beyond that. those closing speeds are for yount 30.06 bullets. the truth is we don't just hit a bullet with a bullet. we hit a the side of a bullet with great consistency most of the time. we live in a different world where there may come a time in the four where some jihadist mind-set might gain access to be able to launch some type of nuclear missiles against the united states, and we should not strip ourselves
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 10:00am EDT
the united states government was drafting the moral act and the homestead act of 1862 if they ever thought about the possibility of counter fit operations being established in the midwest and northern great plains.counterfit operati established in the midwest and northern great plains. and if so what were their plans in preventing such an event. >> i found no record of that being a concern it for tfor they department, which particularly in 1862 was, if you read samson chase's, the secretary treasury's diary, it becomes clear that he was running an endless effort simply to fund the next day's operations. or argue bring the past weably operations. day after day he comes in to his office to find million of dollars of unpaid bills on his desk and he'll complain about the fact that he has no idea how to pay them. and if they had been paid in cou counterfeit money, i think that would have been fine with him. most of the republican party was strongly opposed to the idea of fiat money, greenback money, to begin with. chase and lincoln were really driven to the wall by the fact that they had no alt
CSPAN
May 14, 2012 10:00am EDT
, this is in the security interests of the united states. over the past four years we of issued four report . the most recent was on february 1. as jason indicated, it included a distinguished panel of democratic members of congress, three retired generals and admirals, and distinguished foreign policy and energy experts. the last report reinforced the view we have always held is that the best approach to this crisis is a simultaneous pursuit of a triple track policy, which is diplomacy, tough sanctions, and credible, in visible military threat, and also, we issued a white paper in the past couple of months on each of those tracks. i will quickly highlight one recommendation on each of those, and then i will turn it over to mort zuckerman. sanctions, the progress of the nuclear program to determine the degree to which sanctions are forcing iran to slow down the clear development. we believe the united states should boost the credibility of its own and israel's military threat to iran as a nuclear facility. we have spelled out how to do so, and one element has been selling israel bunker busters' and ae
CSPAN
May 5, 2012 11:45pm EDT
second term as president of the united states. [cheers and applause] [chanting] >> now, governor romney is a patriotic american. he has raised a wonderful family, and he has much to be proud of. he runs a large financial firm, but i think he has learned the wrong lessons from these experiences. he sincerely believes that ceos and wealthy investors like him make money, the rest of us will automatically prosper well. when a woman in iowa shares the story of her financial struggles he responded with financial theory. he said hour productivity equals our income. let me tell you something, virginia, the problem with our economy is not that the american people aren't productive enough. you've never worked harder in your lives. you're working harder than ever. the challenge we face right now--the challenge we faced for over a decade is harder work and higher incomes. it's bigger profits have not led to better jobs. governor romney does not seem to get that. he doesn't seem to understand that maximizing profits by whatever means necessary, whether it's your layoffs, joys sourcing, union
SFGTV2
May 17, 2012 2:30am PDT
.s. born workers in the united states from the 1990's to 2005 were better off because of the immigrant, both documented and undocumented, presence in the united states. their earnings were enhanced by about 2.7%. why? it's complicated and i'll send a link to the commission so you can look at the exciting charts and graphs and do that to your heart's desire. it comes down to a simple idea which is intuitive and you know it. the economy is not a fixed pie. when you expand the labor curve, a simple economist will say the price of labor goes down and we're all hurt. the more people that work here, the more people that are chasing jobs and we're all doomed. wrong. the expansion of the available labor force creates opportunities that did not exist before. you have innovation and entrepreneurialism that increases the actual size of small and medium-sized businesses. they consume and that expands the demand curve. you have a dynamic economy for 90% of u.s. born workers that enhances their wages. the other 9% got whacked up side the head with globalization and immigration and everything you can
PBS
Apr 30, 2012 6:00pm PDT
: >> everybody wants to stay healthy. when i moved to the united states almost three years ago i could not find one that worked for me. i became inspired to bring a new definition of quality to the world. today it's working to fulfill our mission of bringing omega 3s to everyone because omega 3s are essential to life. >> citi turns 200 this year. in that time, there have been some good days and some difficult ones. but through it all, we persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. >> bnsf railway. >. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the mystery surrounding an escaped chinese dissident de
CSPAN
May 21, 2012 1:25am EDT
themselves to interpret the picture. but let me see. separating from the rest of the world, the united states of america. filet and i have adopted as my home. it has paid less and less literally to the translation. there has been a lot of more translation of english literature than there was from the land that many considered to be the end of the. >>host: is there a contemporary woman right to you would recommend? >>guest: absolutely. let me say first in spite of the islamic republic or because it is usually u.s. wants. the big men are center stage. one example. 1947 the first major collection of short stories pro but then passed away a couple of weeks ago. at the age of 19. when they pull it goes back and cannot you don't need a directors, crew, the women are formed in the segregated society. 1947 you have those 30 equal to the number of men. but look gain at conscientious when this talk about the national poets of our country. not recognized by the government but by the people. inside and outside that could to save. the first time has become day woman from my country. >>host: we're really l
MSNBC
May 1, 2012 9:00pm PDT
the daily schedule put out by the white house where the president of the united states turned out to be a deliberate fabrication because for security reasons he made a trip under the veil of secrecy. this is standard operating procedure for presidents visiting america's various war zones. shortly after the 2008 election in which he was elected president, after the election but before the new president had been sworn in in december of 2008, then still president george w. bush took one of these surprise trips the, unannounced trips to background. it was december 14th, 2008. that's when this happened. >> yes. everybody calm down for a minute. first of all, thank you for apologizing on behalf of the iraqi people. it doesn't bother me. if you want the facts, it's a size 10 shoe that he threw. >> boy, if you were not surprised enough to find out that the president had surprise, gone to iraq, the president having a shoe hurled at him was definitely a surprise that day. when you look at the official transcript from this, we posted a link to it on our blog tonight. when you go through the
WHUT
May 7, 2012 10:02am EDT
remember when wiki leex came out in the united states, right. >> rose: yes, i remember. >> i was in the emirates at the time and i was seated next to a minister. >> rose: you hang out in the emirates but i don't. >> i don't hang out in the emirates, that's not truement i was there for the weekend. >> rose: for a conference or something. >> some god forsakeen conference and i was sitting next to some minister from qatar without said to me that we believed that we actually leaked wiki leaks ourselves because it made us look so good. >> rose: there were those kinds of conversations in which diplomats were heard, unknowing to themselves, that they might be later seen and heard to everybody who could go on the internet saying good thing-- things and positive things and things that were in the interest of good things. >> indeed. and look, what did it reflect. what we learned from wikileaks, we learned that karzai was corruption. we learned that christina kirchner in arg stin-- argentina was considered by hillary clinton was considered to be emotionally unstable, shocking, right, sh
FOX News
May 6, 2012 6:00pm EDT
guangcheng who the government now says can apply for a travel permit to go to the united states to study. before secretary of state, hillary clinton worked out this deal with the beijing government, mitt romney weighed in. here is what he said about the chen case. >> this is a dark day for freedom. and a day of shame for the obama administration. did governor romney overreact in the middle of the diplomatic crisis? >>guest: no, i don't think so. this crisis is a reminder of what we are dealing with in china. we hope there are reformers in the government pushing for a more open system but we know we are dealing with people that are paranoid and control freaks. and totalitarian system. they control everything from the words you can search on the internet to who visits this gentleman when he was in jail, i'm sorry, in the hospital. these are things that we are dealing with. second, there is a propensity thing has of unwillingness to force any assert america's values. tragically we saw that in 2009 during the green revolution in iran and we see that here now, in china, where somehow this adm
CSPAN
May 1, 2012 6:00am EDT
actors are the only ones able to do something. does that mean the united states has to physically, that is in fact not the obvious policy implication of what i am setting. in fact, iraq should have told us our presence there in some ways created more problems than help. the presence in afghanistan might have created more problems than it help to solve. so i am not making an argument for some sort of boots on the ground u.s. must be physically involved in all of these places. >> there is another thing that we will forget at our peril. that is throughout the 1980's and 1990's, we saw salafi islam as an antidote. they're not going to be revolutionary. -- we thought they were not going to be revolutionary. we thought there were praying and wearing beards and so on. they have metastasized into this thing. even the whole creation of the taliban itself -- this was linked to regional rivalries. we have to look at the country. it cannot start -- [unintelligible] the other thing -- it is a pity mary laughed. you have to have a dialectic approach. in afghanistan, people turn to al qaeda as a
FOX News
May 27, 2012 3:00pm PDT
weekend, the united states faces military and diplomatic challenges. we will discuss stalled talks with iran and continuing tensions with pakistan, and the war in afghanistan. with one of the g.o.p.'s leading voices on foreign policy, senate john mccain. then, catholic institutions take the obama administration to court. over its insurance mandate on contraception. is it an issue of religious freedom? or women's health? we will ask a top church official pushing the legal challenge, cardinal wuerl archbishop of washington. plus, are president obama attacks on governor romney's business record working? and our power player of the week, a remarkable story of devotion to country and sacrifice you will not want to miss. all right now. on fox news sunday. and hello again on this memorial day weekend. from fox news in washington. as we remember those who is given their lives defending our country, we continue to face foreign policy challenges. here to tackle all of that is senator john mccain. welcome back to fox news sunday. >>guest: thank you for having me on especially memorial day. >>
MSNBC
May 1, 2012 11:00pm PDT
to sell -- trying to explain why the united states is going to be staying in afghanistan in one form or another for another, what is it now, 12 years. i mean, that is an amazing number when you think about it. a ten-year commit many here. now this is both on the economics front and on troops and all of that is still to be negotiated. every years, there will be a lobbying effort to convince congress to fund aid programs to afghanistan. we can only imagine what some of those political fights might look like over the next decade, plus two years. that said, this isn't going to be the easiest thing for the president to be explaining tonight. this is not spiking the football. i think at first when people heard rumor the president was going to afghanistan, is he simply having an ewith the troops on the day to mark the anniversary? no, he is trying to sell the what is not the most popular policy. you know what, we will be in afghanistan longer than folks want to be. but let me say why we will be there. i don't want to repeat 1989 when the u.s. abandoned afghanistan after helping beat the sov
CSPAN
May 14, 2012 11:00pm EDT
is that the united states as a individual nation and nato collectively as an alliance have to do long-term thinking about where it. wants to be in ten or eight years time. and outline the type of missions it envisions undertaking in the future and what capabilities will be required to undertake the missions. and kind of set some -- identify some kind of priority areas for the alliance knowing that most allies simply aren't going to be able to do everything every time. not every ally will be able to do everything from peace keeping to high intensity combat. we have a number of al thrice have reached that point and are starting to specialize and develop these capabilities if it's not coordinated you could end up with everybody. it's like a pot luck dinner. you don't have any main course when everybody brings desert. the summit going to try to start the alliance on the healthier course. but it's also going to start first and foremost with delivering on some commitments made in lisbon. you might remember, the alliance watched the lisbon critical caimentn'ts commitment. where the alliance identified ten
Current
May 3, 2012 8:00pm PDT
dialogue the united states raises the importance of human rights and fundamental freedom. >> here to unravel this mystery, is former assistant secretary of state for pubic affairs under president obama, p.j. crowley. thank you so much for your time tonight. >> good evening, eliot. >> help me out here i have been reading these stories as they have been emerging. explain to me -- who is mr. chen and why is the entire world focused on him? is he that important? was he that fundamental of civil rights voice in china. >> well, you gave a pretty good synopsis of what he is trying to do what makes him unusual as an activist in china who has come to the attention and not positively so the chinese government is actually his instinct was to find a way to continue his activism while staying in china. the united states has a long history of -- of bringing activists from china, safe passage in asylum in the united states so this was potentially a revolutionary situation. unfortunately china has reverted back to form. they have been cracking down on dissidents for a number of
PBS
May 19, 2012 11:30am PDT
of united states becoming majority-minority company. >> we best make haste because the new majority is the least well educated to compete our country in the global economy. >> with low birth rate and 10,000 baby boomers entering medicare every day, this will help fill that fiscal gap that we have of taxpayer government funded programs. >> i'm going to echo what the congresswoman said, education is the most important issue, these communities have higher barriers for both higher education, k-12 education furlong time we've said that is a hispanic issue, black issue, now all of our issue. how we educate those students is how the country will change in the next hundred years. >> i think we have immigrants paying info a system that they're not necessarily eligible for. and in addition we have increasing number of nontraditional families who deserve ownership over their retirement assets. >> entitlement reforms? you're saying that -- >> social security reform. medicare. >> there are people who are paying phone a system that they're not eligible to get money back out. that is not proper. i
CSPAN
May 23, 2012 10:30am EDT
nautical miles from shore. the relevant area for the united states is probably more than 1.5 times the size of texas. in fact, we believe it could be considerably larger. u.s. oil and gas companies are now ready, willing, and able to explore this area. but they have made it clear to us that they need the maximum level of international legal certainty before they will or could make the substantial investments. and we believe create many jobs in doing so, needed to extract these far offshore resources. if we were a party to the convention, we would gain international recognition of our sovereign rights, including by using the convention's procedures and therefore, be able to give our oil and gas companies this legal certainty. staying outside the convention, we simply cannot. the second development concerns deep seabed mining which takes place in that part of the ocean floor that is beyond any country's jurisdiction. now, for years, technological challenges meant that deep seabed mining was only theoretical. today's advances make it very real. but it's also very expense of. and before any com
CSPAN
May 10, 2012 6:00pm EDT
to that part of the world and to syria in particular, but to do this the united states needs to work in concert with our allies. we need to work in concert particularly with those countries in the united nations that form with us the p-5. russia i think shares the goal. i won't speak for sergei. i think i will let them speak. i think they share the goal of stability and an end to violence. we share a strategic vision of what's happening in syria, but we've had some disagreement on the tactics that we should take to bring that about. we are committed to continuing to do everything in our power to end the violence, to see an orderly succession take place. we have made very clear we think president asad's time has come and gone, and we hope very, very much through the dialog we've had with russia and with our other partners in new york, that we will continue to find ways to hasten that kind of change in transition so that the people in syria can live normal lives free from violence. >> i will add to that that we want violence ceased. we want political dialog of all the signs in syria to be engagin
CSPAN
May 3, 2012 10:00pm EDT
as dark winter, where they theorized the placing of smallpox in three locations in the united states, major metropolitan hubs with air terminals, and within a year it concluded, this independent study concluded that there would be more than a million americans dead as a result of that. not a nuclear attack. not a chemical attack, but in effect a biological attack. and not a complicated one. not something that takes a lot of money or a lot of skill sets. imagine a million people -- imagine our country, if the goal of terror is to terrorize, to alter your behavior. imagine what the behavior pattern would have been in our country. there would be martial law. you'd have people guarding their state boundaries to try to avoid -- when i grew up, if you had smallpox or chickenpox or measles, they put a quarantine sign on your house. and you weren't allowed to go out. and no one was allowed to go into your house. this is back in the 1930s. you can imagine the whole country doing that. petrified. because of the lack of protection against smallpox. and that was very much in the president's mind
CSPAN
May 1, 2012 6:30pm EDT
no doubt about the resolve of the united states or about israel's sovereign right to defend itself. as the president has said, we take no options off the table. of course, iran's nuclear program is not the only regional issue that is of concern to israel or its leaders. in a period of sweeping regional change that brings new opportunities but also new challenges and uncertainties, the united states will continue to bear israel's security in mind as we develop and implement our foreign policy in response to these challenges. concerning israel's neighbor, syria, we believe that the longer assad remains in power, the greater the risk that his brutal tactics will destabilize syria and possibly the region. for that reason, we are working with our international partners to pressure assad to step down as soon as possible so that a syrian-led stable and democratic transition can get going. in egypt we have supported the historic transition to democracy that began last spring. this will continue to be a bumpy ride. as egyptians debates freely the big issues of the day for the first time in
CSPAN
May 12, 2012 10:30am EDT
, but mainly documents and memories. documents and memories. the united states government and other entities devote quite a lot of effort to getting and preserving documents, and sometimes things. you can go to the smithsonian museum and see a bunch of things. and some documents. so we devote some effort to securing and preserving the documents and things. the memories which i think you probably admit from your own life are more interesting than your documents, are not really preserved with any active effort whatsoever. the united states government spends almost no money to preserve the memories, record any of the memories, least of all from the people who helped run the government of the most powerful country in the world. it simply is not an important effort for the united states government. we don't spend much money on basic research in american history of any kind. in this particular form we spend none as a government, as a country. i mentioned this as background for the fact that the miller center thought this was important. there was an initial effort under my predecessor, the director
CSPAN
May 12, 2012 7:00pm EDT
are not strangers for the united states. it has been 17 years since the socialists have been in power and had the presidency. they ran the government a decade ago. we have always had a good relationship with any government that is there in france. i am confident we will have a good relationship with the government in france. we have to see how this government is going to deal with the issues of the day. i will keep france integrated in command structure -- he will keep france integrated into the command structure. that was a remarkable decision by sarkozy. the integrated in the command structure gives you a voice and a say over what happens in internal affairs of the military operation. it is important. there are benefits from being fully integrated. i would suspect this is a benefit that will remain even if there may be differences of degree as policies go on. that is what elections are all about, to enable the people to express themselves and vote in new governments who will have to decide how they want to pursue policies. on the big foreign policy issues, i expect more continuity. >> he ta
Current
May 1, 2012 6:00pm PDT
is canc not just here in the united states, but within afghanistan. you know, being able to come to president karzai and sign this agreement and show the afghan people the united states is going to remain engaged in the region and send a compelling message to nair neighbors that have meddled in their appars on affair, pakistan next door, the united states will be here and continue to try to help afghanistan move forward. >> thank you pj for joining us inside the war room. that is pj crowley former assist isant to the secretary of state of affairs. of and here to discuss the strategic interests of the trip and a little politics is the assistant secretary of defense for global strategic affairs in the obamaa administration and former dean of the goldman school of policy, professor doctor, thank you so much for joining us inside the war room. you heard what pj crowley said about the agreement. do you agree with the three goals you think were identified in that? and how important is the strategic interests of that agr
CSPAN
May 15, 2012 11:00pm EDT
of access to new drugs, not only in the united states, but throughout the world. others have referred to a number of basic facts, that the united states, for example, has 1.2 million persons living on hiv. and with new infections, that number is growing every year. i can remember when the size of the community was considered 200,000 people and now it's 1.2 million people. and five years from now, it will be more than 1.2 million people. you mentioned the cost of a triplet being $25,000 a year. that's a fairly inexpensive calculative in the current environment in the united states. some of the more expensive regimes, even for treatment of these patients could be as much as $35,000 and for people that have developed drug resistance, which a lot of patients that will happen to them over their period of treatment is a lifelong treatment occur at present. the treatments could be $50,000 to $75,000 per year. i don't see how you take a country with 1.2 million people that have that condition and impose those kinds of astronomical costs. the cdc currently says 64% of the people living in the
MSNBC
May 2, 2012 12:00am EDT
. it's to commit both countries to a plan by which the united states will end our war there. >> today i signed an agreement between the united states and afghanistan that defines a new relationship between our countries. a future in which afghans are responsible for the security of their nation and we build an equal partnership between two states. as we move forward some people will ask why we need a firm timeline. the answer is clear. our goal is not to build a country in america's image or to eradicate the taliban. these objectives would require in many years, many more dollars and most importantly many more american lives. our goal is to destroy al qaeda and we on path to do exactly that. afghans want to assert their sovereignty and build a lasting peace. the agreement we signed today sends a clear message to the afghan people. as you stand up, you will not stand alone. within this framework we'll work with the afghans to determine what support they need to accomplish two narrow security missions beyond 2014. counter terrorism, and continued training. we will not build permanent base
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